Meanwhile in Orange County

Currently, Orange County has a robust transportation network that is the result of past planning efforts dating back to the 1950s with the county’s Master Plan of Arterial Highways (MPAH). The transportation system includes regional highways, arterials and local roadways, bus and rail transit, and regional bikeways, all developed to accommodate the growth patterns of the county, and to meet the needs of its residents.

Orange County currently has over 6,365 lane miles of streets, 1,673 lane miles of regional highways and 51 miles of toll roads, which make up 21% of Orange County’s highway network. In addition, the county also has 263 miles of off‐street bicycle paths, 721 miles of on‐street bicycle lanes, 94 miles of bicycle routes, 40 local bus transit routes and operates three Metrolink routes with stops in Buena Park, Fullerton, Anaheim, Anaheim Canyon, Orange, Santa Ana, Tustin, Irvine, Laguna Niguel, San Juan Capistrano, San Clemente, and San Clemente Pier. The foundations to provide accessible public transportation are in place. However, improvements must be made to meet our growing population.

In 2010, most highway traffic occurred during morning and evening commutes, predominately on 5 Freeway and 55 Freeway, with average speed times as low as 38.2 MPH. Severe traffic congestion throughout Orange County mainly occurs on the 5 Freeway South from Lake Forest to San Clemente, the 5 Freeway and 55 Freeway interchange, the 405 Freeway through Huntington Beach and the 55 Freeway through Orange.

Currently, Measure M2 funding, a voter-approved half-cent sales tax which amounts to roughly $13.5 million dollars, will go toward a variety of projects including:

    • Improving freeways and bottlenecks

    • Signal synchronization projects and arterial capacity improvements

    • Providing Metrolink service in Orange County, community bus service and transit connections to Metrolink stations

    • Environmental mitigation programs

While Measure M2 funding will go far towards improving mobility in Orange County, it alone will not solve all of the county’s projected traffic and transportation problems. In fact, with all of the committed transportation projects, we are still expected to see a 75% increase in overall traffic in South Orange County alone. It is crucial to implement a long-term solution to fix our county’s growing traffic problems.

OR
SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Other text here
Your Information will never be shared with any third party.
OR
SIGN UP FOR UPDATES!
Your Information will never be shared with any third party.